photography

Collecting as art

Bernd & Hilla Becher, Gravel Plants

Bernd & Hilla Becher, Gravel Plants

Lately I have become interested in artists for whom collecting is central to their process. Dealing with taxonomies and systems of classification, their work is, at least in part, a critique of the activities of museums and collecting institutions or individuals. Fundamentally, these artists are exploring notions of identity through quantitative assessment. Here, identity is expressed through an ontology—a system of objects, representing a particular and unique perspective. A collection seeks to establish a framework by which to formalize, structure and express its content. Through their work, these artists critique that framework at different levels—relating to individual identity, the role of the institution, or society at large.

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The appeal of simulation / 3 comments

Google Maps Street View

Google Maps Street View

Google Maps recently launched its latest feature, a panoramic, street-level view of several major US cities. Despite not being the first of its kind, this is the most satisfying street-level simulation I have seen. In particular, what Google has brilliantly solved is the question of navigation and performance, once again demonstrating the importance of execution. Yet, beyond technical sophistication, my interest lies in the artifact created by this new type of visualization.

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Seams and seamlessness / 1 comment

The world around us is defined by seams. Seams exist in transitional areas as spaces (however small) between objects, where objects lie directly adjacent to one another. Seams can reveal how objects and materials relate to their context. Looking closer at these transitional moments may give insight into intent: whether integration or contrast, attention to detail or the larger concept.

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