design

Compression of time / 2 comments

Hiroshi Sugimoto, Radio City Music Hall (1978)

Hiroshi Sugimoto, Radio City Music Hall (1978)

In the past few months, I’ve come across a variety of work dealing, in one way or another, with compression of time as a method for visualization. Despite the wide range of work, there are particular generalizable attributes which I will identify.

The first few examples are time lapse renderings, in which the view remains fixed as all information gathered over a period of time is displayed simultaneously.

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Interpretation and information control

Over the years, a wealth of data has become available online. With the accessibility of this raw information comes the incentive to understand its relevance or significance. Beyond making it engaging and interesting, there is, more than ever, a need for providing interpretation and perspective. Fundamentally, interpretation is a form of information control.

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Beyond the desktop metaphor / 2 comments

As an extension of the self, the avatar, which (despite the slightly outmoded term) remains a familiar concept from the world of gaming, could become a new paradigm for operating system interfaces. Three tendencies may contribute to this paradigm shift. First, computers are becoming increasingly mobile. Not only are laptops outselling desktops, they are also becoming smaller and lighter. Second, computers are becoming more ubiquitous: computer operating systems are increasingly powering other devices as well, such as cell phones, PDAs and music players. Third, networks are becoming pervasive, allowing more communication between connected mobile computing devices.

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Visual rhetoric and the idea / 3 comments

The design of information can be understood as visual rhetoric. While often used in the pejorative sense, rhetoric means the art of speech and writing. As Hugues C. Boekraad writes in his essay in Copy Proof, rhetoric lessens or erases the distance between the message and the recipient. That is what communication design, at least in practice, sets out to achieve, and information design should be no different. The quality of the message being communicated is entirely dependent on intent, or, in other words, visual rhetoric.

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