borders

Borders, areas and fractals / 1 comment

A border is generally seen as a line of separation. A line, however, is a theoretical construct. A border is in fact an area, defined by its own boundaries—boundaries which are themselves areas. Interpreted this way, borders can be compared to fractals. Ranging from the infinitely large to the infinitely small, borders create further borders—geographically, as well as conceptually. read the rest of this entry

The boundaries of a development / 3 comments

Atlantic Yards boundaries

Atlantic Yards boundaries

The approval of the controversial Atlantic Yards development has renewed my interest in political and economic boundaries. At a pivotal point in Brooklyn, this project will dramatically transform the character of the area by drawing new business and creating economic growth. The development promises to create a sense of place from an urban void—the yards, which are inaccessible to the public, and currently separate four communities.

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Seams and seamlessness / 1 comment

The world around us is defined by seams. Seams exist in transitional areas as spaces (however small) between objects, where objects lie directly adjacent to one another. Seams can reveal how objects and materials relate to their context. Looking closer at these transitional moments may give insight into intent: whether integration or contrast, attention to detail or the larger concept.

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